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Stonehenge and Avebury photos


On our way to Cornwall, Stonehenge was close to the way and and I wanted to see it for a long time. So we made a little detour after Bristol and camped very near. But there was so much else too look at in this area. We roughly planned a whole day to look at stone circles and other neolithic sites. As usual with my photography posts: click to enlarge.

Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog

Avebury

We started the day slowly and arrived at Avebury for lunch. Then we had a look at the exhibitions in the thatched roof building known as Alexander Keiller Museum. The small round house on the picture is a pigeonry that belongs to the manor in the background. 
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog

When we walked around the stone circle two things stood out to us. First the outer circle is really big, about a few hundred meters in diameter and second, there is a village in the middle of it. While many stones are not there anymore, the henge and ditch show it's dimensions.

Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog

We had to cross a some roads and then stopped by the pub for a pint. On-wards to the second half, we saw the remains of the two smaller circles and a lot of sheep. Away from (or towards) the stone circle leads the West Kennet Avenue, but we didn't have the time to explore.

Stonehenge and Avebury photos - The Sanctuary - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
But we stopped by The Sanctuary nearby, which was a stone and timber circle. Admittedly, it doesn't look very impressive, because there are only concrete blocks where the posts once stood. But the place had a certain feel to it and you could see people had left flowers and coins.

Stonehenge

In contrast to the last landmarks, Stonehenge is very busy and you have to get a (paid) ticket. As we are members of English Heritage entry was free, but I booked online two days before. I choose the last time slot of the day, as I wanted the highlight with the least amount of other people.

Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog

There was an impressive multi-media exhibition and reconstructed neolithic houses next to the modern building, where we spent almost an hour. Then we took the bus to the stone circle, but got out half way to walk the rest. I'd definitely recommend seeing it from the top of a hill first.

Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
The above photo is the closest as you can get to the stones. With thousands of visitors every day it's understandable that the archaeological site has to be protected. As there where still too many around for my taste, we sat on the grass and listened to the audioguide until it got quieter.
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Rook - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
There where also a lot of these curious black birds watching the people and coming rather close. I wondered if they where crows or ravens and found out later it's actually rooks (Saatkrähen). It was great to take the time to enjoy this place on a sunny (a bit windy though) late afternoon.
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
Stonehenge and Avebury photos - Zebraspider DIY Anti-Fashion Blog
When we finally walked around, there where just a few people left and I could take some nice photos. We where the last people to leave the site, quickly made the picture with me and then took last bus. I'm sure I'll come back one day, hopefully for a small group tour where it's possible to get into the circle.

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Kommentar schreiben

Kommentare: 2
  • #1

    Frau Jule (Donnerstag, 19 Dezember 2019 05:20)

    extrem faszinierend. so steine. immer. egal wie sie wohin gekkommen sind. was für broken. sieht wunderbar aus.
    liebst,
    jule*

  • #2

    Janina (Freitag, 20 Dezember 2019 17:46)

    Danke! Da kann ich nur zustimmen, besonders wenn sie 4-5000 Jahre alt sind :)
    Liebe Grüße
    Janina